Skip directly to: Main page content

Forest Biology Research Center

Students


Elena Aguaron
Department: Plant Science/Geography
E-mail: eaguaron@ucdavis.edu
Phone: (530) 574-2479
Monica Aparicio
Department: Environmental Science and Policy
E-mail: maparicio@ucdavis.edu
Web Site: Click Here
Research: I'm interested in GIS analysis, habitat connectivity, forest management and rehabilitation of degraded areas.
Jackson Audley
Department: Entomology
E-mail: jpaudley@ucdavis.edu
Research: I am interested in studying the interaction between invasive bark and wood-boring beetles and native trees and forest ecosystems. My current research in the Seybold lab is focused on the chemical and behavioral ecology of the walnut twig beetle, an invasive scolytid that attacks walnut trees and vectors the fungal pathogen Geosmithia morbida. Together, these organisms comprise the insect-pathogen complex known as thousand cankers disease. We seek to develop volatile repellents as a means of disrupting the beetle's host recognition mechanisms and thus protect trees from successful attacks.
Gabrielle Bohlman
Department: Plant Sciences
E-mail: gnbohlman@ucdavis.edu
Maisie Borg
Department: Environmental Science & Policy
E-mail: maborg@ucdavis.edu
Phone: 707-227-0393
Ryan Byrnes
Department: Plant Sciences/International Ag. Dev.
E-mail: rbyrnes@ucdavis.edu
Research: I am interested in forestry in the context of agroforestry in international agricultural development. Specifically, I am interested in understanding both the social and biophysical implications of the implementation of agroforestry systems in agricultural systems. I am also interested in looking at how these systems could benefit small-holder farming communities in terms of ecosystem services, access to nutritious foods and increasing the profitability and productivity of farming systems.
Rosalie Carnam
Department: Plant Pathology
E-mail: racarnam@ucdavis.edu
Phone: (707) 499-9221
Mason Earles
Department: Plant Sciences (Ecology)
E-mail: jmearles@ucdavis.edu
Research: I'm interested in fire, climate change, and forest dynamics. Currently, I'm examining how forest structure and productivity differ under historic and modern fire regimes in California. I'm also interested in how changing climatic conditions will affect fire regimes and subsequently species distribution.
Aaron Haiman
Department: Animal Behavior
E-mail: anhaiman@ucdavis.edu
Research: I study the effects of behaviors on social associations and divergence of a forest songbird, the Evening Grosbeak. The first step towards conserving biodiversity is to determine how many species and subspecies exist. To this end I am have examined the vocal and physical differences that exist between different geographic populations of Evening Grosbeaks, and whether they represent separate subspecies. Determining if any of these differences act as barriers to mixing between these populations, and also whether any of these differences represent adaptations to specific resources will be the focus of my current work. For example, different calls exist, but do individuals respond more strongly to their own call type or the calls of others? Different bill shapes exist, but is this an indication that different populations eat different seeds and so use different types of habitat? These questions, and others like them, are crucial to understanding and preserving the natural world around us, and I hope to pursue their answers in my career as an avian biologist.
Mila Hickenbottom
Department: Plant Sciences
E-mail: medunbar@ucdavis.edu
Phone: 206-660-9498
Stacy Hishinuma
Department: Entomology
E-mail: smhishin@ucdavis.edu
Phone: 818-624-8021
Kassandra Kasparek
Department: Biotechnology
E-mail: kassandra16@gmail.com
Phone: 831-622-9058
Jake Madison
E-mail: jameszheng66@gmail.com
Phone: 415-218-4170
Crivat Margareta
E-mail: margareta.crivat@yahoo.com
Phone: 0040766741774
Laura Morales
Department: Plant Sciences
E-mail: lvmorales@ucdavis.edu
Research: I am generally interested in linking research to management practice and needs, particularly in the context of restoration and conservation. Polylepis forests & woodlands in the Peruvian Andes are my current area of study. Specifically I am interested in improving knowledge of the ecology of these forests using both observational and manipulative studies that can inform us as to the feasibility of alternative management interventions besides active reforestation. I focus on understanding early regeneration & grassland colonization dynamics in addressing questions like 1) Could forest patches potentially expand to surrounding grasslands given human land-use (grazing & fire)?, 2) Would passive restoration work in such a landscape and on what timescale & how feasible would implementing it be? 3) How might changing climate influence the regeneration at forest edges? Research interests: Restoration ecology, human land-use, forest conservation, plant demography, tropical & alpine ecology, natural resource management
Roisin Murphy-Deak
Department: Environmental Science & Policy
E-mail: ramurphydeak@ucdavis.edu
Phone: 5108464398
Jan Ng
Department: Plant Sciences (Ecology)
E-mail: jnyng@ucdavis.edu
Research: I am interested in the role that coarse woody debris plays in seedling regeneration, and how this role might change among forests with different disturbance regimes. I am also interested in forest management strategies, and how cultural perceptions of nature influence the ways in which we interact with it.
Shawn Overstreet
Department: Horticulture & Agronomy
E-mail: smoverstreet@ucdavis.edu
Research: I am interested in oaks, chestnuts, and masting behavior.
Aida Sofia Rivera Sotelo
Department: Socio-cultural Anthropology
E-mail: ariverasotelo@ucdavis.edu
Research: Grounded in the low part of the Cauca River Basin in Colombia, where there is an ongoing armed conflict and various gold mining operations, I ask whether or not reforestation practices by various entrepreneurs, campesinos and local governments are able to improve soil conditions, water and nutrients? Do the armed confrontations and the diverse mining operations frustrate any restauration possibility? Do the private decisions of the various actors about what trees to grow and under what conditions affect the growing conditions of forests? Might the emerging conditions of multi-species competition and facilitation exceed the degradation effects of war and gold mining?
Noam Ross
Department: Environmental Science and Policy
E-mail: nmross@ucdavis.edu
Web Site: Click Here
Research: I am interested in problems related to forecasting non-linear changes in ecosystems, how to use such forecasts in decision making. In particular, I am interested in finding ways to predict imminent die-offs in forests stressed by drought and insect outbreaks, and currently work on pinyon forests of the American Southwest.
Allison Simler
Department: Plant Pathology
E-mail: absimler@ucdavis.edu
Brian Smithers
Department: Plant Sciences
E-mail: bsmithers@ucdavis.edu
Research: Things that live on the edge interest me, specifically plants that live on the edge of their tolerable range. I am currently looking at range shift of sub-alpine forests in the face of climate change. While we know that trees are in the process of moving upslope and poleward in reaction to climate change, I am interested in finding the actual mechanisms of how those species shift, be it by novel competition, fire regime change, abiotic tolerance, some combination, or better yet, something that we haven't figured out yet!
Colleen Spurlock
Department: Plant Sciences
E-mail: clspurlock@ucdavis.edu
Phone: 7074961032
Jens Stevens
Department: Plant Sciences (Ecology)
E-mail: jtstevens@ucdavis.edu
Phone: 530-752-5011
Web Site: Click Here
Research: I am interested in plant population and community responses to human activities in forests, including both direct management practices and indirect changes to climate and fire regimes. My research includes a study on the effects of fuels treatments on forest regeneration and diversity after wildfire in Sierra forests. I am also conducting a transplant study examining interacting effects of snowpack, fire and forest structure on forest invasion by the woody shrubs Scotch and Spanish broom, and a separate study investigating how precipitation variability affects native shrub regeneration across an elevation gradient.
Anita To
E-mail: lato@ucdavis.edu
Benjamin Waitman
Department: Plant Sciences
E-mail: bawaitma@ucdavis.edu
Phone: 530-754-8729
Alexandra Weill
Department: Plant Sciences / Ecology
E-mail: amweill@ucdavis.edu
Web Site: Click Here
Kevin Welch
Department: Ecology
E-mail: kevin.boca@gmail.com
Phone: 415 385 0660
Chhaya Werner
Department: Population Biology
E-mail: cwerner@ucdavis.edu
Derek Young
Department: Plant Sciences
E-mail: djyoung@ucdavis.edu
Web Site: Click Here
Research: I am interested in the ecology, management, and restoration of California forests under climate change. I am working to identify situations in which the natural migratory and/or adaptive capacity of tree populations will be insufficient to keep pace with expected changes in climate. I am also interested in evaluating potential management interventions for maintaining healthy forests when natural capacity to respond to climate change is insufficient.
Yuanting Zheng
E-mail: Ytzheng@ucdavis.edu
Phone: 5306018746